.Net Core 2.0 is officially here!

Following hot on the heels of our article the other day about .Net Conf 2017, Microsoft have just made the official announcement of the release of both .Net Core 2.0 here and .Net Standard 2.0 here.

This is potentially a watershed moment in the evolution of .Net Core as the high performance, cross-platform  .Net runtime for web, windows desktop, console, holo-lens and IoT.

The new APIs should embolden and empower teams looking to start or continue developing applications using the .Net Core runtime.

For more information on why this is so significant, you can check out our previous post here.

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One not to miss – .Net Conf Sept 19 – 21, 2017

Coming at one of the most significant periods in the evolution of the .Net Framework, .Net Conf is a free 3-day event with a series of presentations meant to inspire developers for their next project.

The sessions are live so attendees have the opportunity to ask questions live.

The event offers presentations on .NET Core and ASP.NET Core, C#, F#, Roslyn, Visual Studio, Xamarin, and much more.

It has some really big names such as

  • Scott Hanselman
  • Scott Hunter
  • Jon Skeet

And many others from every major platform and aspect of .Net development.

 

So what’s the big deal?

Quarter 3 (which this event effectively rounds off) will see the launch of .Net Core 2 and .Net Standard 2.  Both are effectively game changers that should see a massive increase of both interest and adoption of the newer .Net platforms i.e. Net Core and Xamarin.  So there has never been a better time to take a look at the latest developments on your particular areas of interest.

.Net Core 2 – bringing back some old friends

With .Net Core being an effective rewrite of the framework it is no surprise that the first version had the foundational features included, but was missing many APIs that older applications relied on.  .Net Core 2 brings around 10000 APIs back into the mix which should increase the ease with which teams can start moving to using newer versions of the framework.

.Net Standard 2 – including the masses

.Net Standard has been a much better way of handling cross-platform compatibility for libraries than the old portable class library solution.  One limitation with v1 was that a library targeting .Net Standard would only be able to reference other .Net Standard libraries or portable class library thus omitting the vast majority of Nuget Packages.  V2 allows this via a compatibility shim and should allow around 70% of currently published Nuget packages to work with packages targeting .Net Standard.

You can read all about .Net Standard here

You can read more on the why .Net Standard 2.0 is so significant to .Net Core here.